Koimoi Recommends Garfield, A Short Film That Made It To The Sundance Film Festival In 2017
Koimoi Recommends Georgi Bank-Davies Garfield(Pic Credit: Youtube/Omeleto)

It is not a fact to be surprised about, but discrimination is a riding force across the globe, and majorly the ride is downwards. Cast, colour, appearance, status, language, gender, say it, and the guards of the society stand tall and take pride in discriminating humans with one or the other above mention things. In such circumstances, what happens two of the discriminated souls meets and decided to share their ordeal? Garfield that was nominated at the Sundance Film Festival, is a 12-minute gaze at two individuals falling for each other while they discuss their problematic stories of being bullied.

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Today on Koimoi Recommends, I recommend you this 2017 short, that is bloomy but also eye-opening about the west, and its atrocities.

Director: Georgi Bank-Davies

Language: English

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Available On: YouTube

A perfect opening to a romantic saga, a guy and a girl get drunk over their limits and crash at the guy’s place, calling it a night. They wake the following day without any idea of how they reached there, in what circumstances, what happened between them, and if it was a good idea. She introduces herself as Krishna. He calls himself Garfield. And they begin to explore their existence, and the rest is an experience you must watch.

Myra Appannah and Georgi Bank-Davies, together realise that people talking about discrimination on race, colour, and roots is a topic explored in Hollywood time and again. To make it more indulgent and intriguing, they add romance to the conversation. Here is an Indian brought up in the states and a redhead staying there. Two of the most discriminated aspects of the American society, one on the basis of colour, and the other on the basis of having red hair.

(Pic Credit: Youtube/Omeleto)

Krishna and Garfield begin talking. When he asks for her number, she jokingly says, ‘you are a ginger’. Not that discrimination has taught her to avoid being racist to others. She still chooses to crack the joke, is a nod at how calling redheads ‘ginger,’ is a common part of the American culture. But she apologises quickly, giving a reminder that she has been on the other end of the ecosystem, and does have empathy.

The makers don’t even give Garfield his name (Garfield is actually an animated character with red hair). He reveals he was called that in the school. What surprises me is the grace, patience and calm he possesses. Qualities that are said to be alien to people with red hair. And that is the very point this movie wants to make. Breaking the stereotypes and set notions.

As the film progresses, both realise they have been on the same receiving end of the spectrum, just for different reasons. Not to forget, even if Krishna is raised in America, her family still follows a conservative attitude, as the text messages suggest. She reveals she was called a coconut in the school. And at this point both make fun of the slangs thrown at them by the world.

Romance blooms and Krishna now trust Garfield because she finds a man satisfied with his existence and ethnicity no matter what. The reap game begins when he decides to drop her home. A ‘ginger’ (pardon me for using the term directly for the first time), dropping a brown girl home set in a predominantly Indian locality in London, that too in some unusual circumstances which you will see. Do you think the heads won’t turn?

The end is open and abrupt. We deserve more, and part 2 is expected. I want to know more, and you will too. Actors Matthew Trevannion and Mandeep Dhillon are a sheer delight as they seamlessly perform like the camera doesn’t exist. Watch the film below.

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