Shefali Shah is a bored housewife who wants some excitement in her life. She meets a criminal on the run, Rahul Bose, taking him to be a private detective. What happens thereafter? Read the review of Kucch Luv Jaisaa to find out…

Kucch Luv Jaisaa Review (Kucch Luv Jaisaa Movie Poster)Business rating: 0.5/5 star

Star cast: Rahul Bose, Shefali Shah, Sumeet Raghavan.

What’s Good: The performances.

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What’s Bad: The screenplay; the inane conversations between Shefali and Rahul; the confused characterisation of Shefali.

Verdict: Kucch Luv Jaisaa doesn’t have much to love in it!

Loo break: A couple of places when the pace drops.

Watch or Not?: Watch it if you are fond of different cinema.

Sunshine Pictures Pvt. Ltd.’s Kucch Luv Jaisaa (UA) is the story of a bored housewife and a criminal on the run and how their worlds meet. Madhu Saxena (Shefali Shah) is a housewife whose life revolves around her husband, Shravan (Sumeet Raghavan), and two kids. Although she does everything humanly possible for her family, she doesn’t get her due as nobody has time for her. It’s her birthday and her family members don’t even remember to wish her. She decides to take a grip over her life. She chooses to head out of her home and enjoy her birthday. She meets Raghav (Rahul Bose), a criminal wanted by the police. He forges passports and helps criminals leave the country on fake names, but he now wants to settle down with his girlfriend, Riya (Neetu Chandra). However, the girlfriend has set a trap for him to be caught by the police.

Even as Raghav is on the run, a casual conversation leads Madhu to believe that Raghav is a private detective. And Raghav plays along… Does this day-long adventure change the lives of Raghav and Madhu?

Barnali Ray Shukla’s story idea is interesting but it is more of the kind which would’ve worked better on television. Her screenplay is so weak that at the end of it, the audience gets the feeling that a mountain has been made out of a molehill. For, most among the audience are likely to ask – so what if the husband forgot to wish the wife many happy returns of the day? Doesn’t it happen so very often? Does every wife decide to teach her husband a lesson for this lapse, by leaving home without informing him, buying herself a car, clothes and shoes and befriending a complete stranger, sharing a hotel room with him, and not taking her worried husband’s calls on her cell phone? Even if one were to accept that this is the story of one such wife, Madhu Saxena, the drama is so poor that nothing rings true in it and the comedy doesn’t even create laughter.

For one, Madhu Saxena is shown to be smart or dumb as per the convenience of the writer. She is smart enough to buy a car in a minute but dumb enough to agree to share a room in a hotel with someone she didn’t even know a few hours back. Madhu Saxena trying to act shy and coy – again, when and only when the writer feels like it – irritates the viewer.

Madhu’s husband doing nothing at all to trace his missing wife except trying to contact her or her parents on phone and looking exasperated also looks weird. The conversations between Madhu and Raghav are just not interesting enough to hold the bored audience’s attention. It is also not clear why Madhu assumes that Raghav is a private detective, why she accompanies him for the day and why he plays along. Wouldn’t he want to run away, especially since the police is hot on his trail? It is absolutely clear in no time that Raghav barely knows English (note, for instance, his question, ‘Ladies kahan hai?’ instead of ‘Lady kahan hai?’) but Madhu keeps speaking to him (often in English) as if he is a Harvard-returned scholar! Why? No reason!

Madhu loses her cool when she realises that Raghav is not a detective and mistakes him for a womaniser instead. Not only is the mistaken identity for the second time a very convenient and half-hearted twist in the tale but even the clarification of the misunderstanding (when the telephone both owner comes to return her the money) is equally childish. What’s more, Madhu lectures Raghav on life and it sounds so ridiculously fake if only because the lecture applies to her as much as it does to him. It indeed looks like a case of the pot calling the kettle black. Also, why would a housewife like Madhu, on learning that she was with a fraud or a womaniser, go to that person’s hotel room and ann- ounce that she was leaving? Would she not fear for her modesty and life and, therefore, run away from there instead?

Kucch Luv Jaisaa Review (Kucch Luv Jaisaa Movie Stills)
Kucch Luv Jaisaa Movie Stills

Kucch Luv Jaisaa Review – Script Analysis

All in all, Barnali Ray Shukla’s screenplay is full of big, gaping holes and is just too philosophical. Even her dialogues are good only at places. The talk of Madhu’s school-going daughter indulging in sex with her boyfriend looks like an aberration because the rest of the film is not about this aspect at all. If the writer wanted to establish, through this sex talk between mother and her school-going daughter, that in spite of the daughter having no time for the mother, the loving mother understands and cares for her daughter always, well, the point is lost. And if the aim of the writer was to bring in the novel – and bold – element of teen sex, the impact is negative because it looks out of place in the film.

Kucch Luv Jaisaa Review – Performances & Direction

Rahul Bose is natural and does a fine job, underplaying to advantage. Shefali Shah is good but overacts at places, probably to camouflage the weaknesses in the script and her character. She is very good in the scenes which require her to change her mood instantly. Sumeet Raghavan does a fine job. Neetu Chandra is okay in a guest appearance. She hardly gets any scope. Amin Hajee is fair. Om Puri is wasted in a guest appearance. Manmeet Singh (as Shravan’s manager), Kunal Kumar (as Shravan’s co-worker), Manish Chaudhari (as a police officer) and Makrand Deshpande provide ordinary support.

Barnali Ray Shukla’s debut direction is alright but her script leaves so much to be desired that even her directorial qualities, evident in the film, will be clouded by it. Pritam’s music score is quite melodious. Naina and Thoda sa pyar are quite tuneful. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics go with the film’s mood. Tapas Relia’s background score is ordinary. Camerawork (Bobby Singh) is fair. Hemanti Sarkar’s editing could have been better.

Kucch Luv Jaisaa Review – Komal Nahta’s Verdict

On the whole, Kucch Luv Jaisaa is a weak fare with bleak box-office prospects.

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